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On February 1, 2016, I founded ContiLaw with great excitement and enthusiasm.

For 22 of my 30 years as a lawyer, I ran my own firm, and with that came the ability to help people with all kinds of problems and at all levels. For the past four years, I was a partner at an excellent firm in the City, which was a wonderful experience. However, I found that I missed having the autonomy to take on cases that I believed in and to use the wisdom and experience gained in my years of practice to make decisions for and with my clients.

So, here I am. Practicing with a great team of compassionate, intelligent and driven attorneys and paralegals, I am committed to giving clients in the Chicagoland area the best legal advice and representation available anywhere.

Please check in to this blog as I will be posting articles on a regular basis about legal issues that may affect you and about the current legal events of the day as I discuss on television and radio.

Please feel free to comment on what we write and, of course, to let me know if you have a need for a lawyer of any type. If I do not have experience to help you, I will do my very best to find you a qualified, competent, trusted lawyer who can!

Along with the lawyers and staff at ContiLaw, I look forward to being in touch with you, keeping you up to speed on current legal events and issues and helping you with your legal matters.

My Best,

Karen

The house you share with your spouse and family is often the most valuable asset acquired during your marriage. It is also where your children live and is the center of your family life for purposes of the children’s schools, friend and activities. However, in making decisions about these issues, you must be practical and realistic.

CAN YOU AFFORD TO STAY IN THE MARITAL HOME?

If possible, the courts like to keep the children in the house for purposes of stability. If one spouse wants to stay in the home, he will have to decide if he afford the monthly expenses and still be able to buy out the interest of the other spouse so she can move on and perhaps buy something herself. If neither party can afford the house alone, it is usually listed for sale and the proceeds divided as the judge deems to be fair.

The terms “custody” and “visitation” are words of the past—at least when it comes to family law in Illinois. As of January 1, 2016, courts will no longer award custody or visitation, but will now “allocate parental responsibilities” and “parenting time.”

Before explaining, I want to say that this is a good change and constitutes more than just the use of new jargon. For so long, we used prison terms for the living and parenting arrangements of children in divorces. That just didn’t work. Parents caught up in the divorce system often fought for custody without knowing what that really meant other than they knew they had to “win;” they had to get “custody.”

That said, how does this change in the law mean for parents and children?

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